Adze Adjustments

IMG_5597

I’ve been getting a lot of good questions from people that, unable to find a good bowl adze, wish to make the most out of a less-than-ideal adze or refurbish an antique adze head.  I’ve written about adzes in several posts, but I thought it would be helpful to pull some ideas together here in this post.  With that in mind, I sketched some ideas above based on the first adze I bought over fifteen years ago, made by Pfeil, that I’ve reworked.

Here are some references that might also help if you’re looking to adjust or tune your adze:

  • Although one adze is versatile enough to many different things, there is no one perfect adze head shape, inner/outer bevel relationship, or set of angles.  Having a general understanding of how adze geometry and bevels work allows you to determine what will work best for you.  Although far from comprehensive, This post should help, and there is a lot of good information in the comment section as well.
  • In the sketch above, I have a simple diagram on grinding a new bevel.  It can involve a lot of work, which requires patience and frequent cooling of the edge.  To grind the outer bevel, I would essentially use the same technique for grinding a gouge bevel described in this post.  And once the grinding is done, this post shows how I go about honing the edge of an adze.
  • Dictum is a tool supplier in Germany, and they have some excellent information on adze geometry, bevels, and handles at this page (scroll down too).  I would qualify some of the statements there, but that would muddy the water unnecessarily.
  • Some more good news:  Blacksmith Jason Lonon plans to focus on lots of adze production this year, so hang in there.
  • There’s other stuff about adzes on the blog here.  Check under the “adze” category to the right.

 

 

Advertisements
This entry was posted in adze, sharpening, tools, Uncategorized and tagged , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

4 Responses to Adze Adjustments

  1. Eddie Mack says:

    Dave,
    Thanks so much for sharing your knowledge. I’m currently working on a pfeil bevel edge and making a handle. I will study your drawings and read all these post to make the best of this attempt. Don’t have hickory stock so trying to use ash for the handle. First attempt ended with the handle splitting when I put in a metal wedge.

    Like

    • Dave Fisher says:

      The ash should work well, Eddie. In fact, it’s what HK uses for their adze handles I think. On short handles like this, many good hardwoods will do the job. I made the handle of my HK adze from oak and it has been serving well for years. On longer handles as for felling axes and the like, the toughness of hickory becomes more important. On your next attempt at fitting the handle, sneak up on a really tight fit before the wedges (wood or steel) come into play. If the handle is really tight in the eye all around a split will be less likely. Of course, it may have been and stuff just happens sometimes! Also, make sure the handle is absolutely bone dry before you do the final fitting. Use a little kiln, or leave it by the woodstove, or something. You don’t want it to shrink at all after the fitting.

      Like

  2. John Reed says:

    Thanks David!

    A ton of good info., you love the lead pencil like I do! Great illustration.

    JReed

    Like

  3. Ken says:

    There is a good maker up here in Toronto Canada.
    http://www.torontoblacksmith.com/new-products/

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s